BREAKING: BLM, ELM CREEK WILD HORSE & BURRO CORRALS EXPOSED


14 September, by Val Cecama-Hogsett

Copyright notice ©CAES article and photos, article and photos may be reprinted in its  entirety, not separated.

 UPDATE – September 15, 2017 we made a call to the facility and got voicemail, we left a message letting them know we would be updating the post with their account of what is going on there. No return call was received. 

 

September 14, 2017 we visited Elm Creek Wild Horse and Burro Corrals. Our Boots on the Ground (BoG) team member found moldy hay and very thin horses in holding corrals with a whole lot of feces.

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

250 wild horses, some burros that were freeze-branded and some still wearing neck tags from recent adoption events were standing in these compacted feces covered corrals. There are shade structures up at this facility, which is not the case in many BLM facilities where wild horses and burros that have been gathered and removed, from their homes and families on the range, are warehoused at great taxpayer expense.  The BLM website states this facility is approximately 35 acres¹ .

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

As anyone who has cared for horses knows, feeding moldy hay can cause serious health issues. Inhaling the mold spores can cause respiratory issues, such as heaves. Ingesting moldy hay can cause digestive issues such as colic, or in severe cases, the horse can die from the toxins called mycotoxins. What we observed were round bales that are moldy, some being stored and some in hay feeders in the corrals as the photos below show you.

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

 

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

Also in this picture directly above you will notice some thin and sucked in horses. Another factor contributing to these underweight horses may be all of the feces in the corrals, and in some areas where hay has been spread on the ground for horses to eat. The number one way for a horse to get a heavy parasite load is from eating off the ground where there is a high incidence of fecal matter. A horse with parasites will often be underweight, and be severe when parasites are not treated. So why are these particular horses so thin? Is this the norm for BLM holding facilities?

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

 

A nursing foal with her mother are kept separate from the others. They may not all be from the same herd or family band. Horses in the wild would not separate from their families like this. Each member of the herd has a role to play in teaching and protecting the young in the band. If this mare was with a band and forced to separate at a holding facility it is very stressful.

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These horses are eating hay off the ground and you can see the one all the way to the right in the photo is very thin.

 

 

 

 

 

 
We will continue our investigation into this facility, the conditions of the horses and the problems that must be addressed.  Updates will be posted on this article as we gather more information. This is not the first time statements have been made eluding to thin horses at this facility.

In 2015, posts advertising mustangs up for adoption from this facility mention they looked a little thin². In 2013 there was an influenza outbreak³.

Our wild horses and burros should not have to live this way. The solution is so simple it’s inexcusable that it has not been implemented. Our wild horses and burros NEVER need to be rounded up and removed from the range. They can be managed very successfully with a birth control vaccine, called PZP, that can be darted from helicopter, darted from the ground, can utilize the many advocate groups that have been offering for years. and would cost far less for the taxpayer. So why isn’t it being done?

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Photo courtesy Mae Martini, CAES BoG team member.

That answer is also simple…the livestock industry and other special interest groups, most very large corporations, want to continue getting extremely cheap permits to use our public lands. If they manage wild horses and burros ON the range, they cannot use as much of the land. They want them gone.


More of Mae’s photos from the Elm Creek holding corrals on September 14, 2017.

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Currently there are herds that are so small that they are no longer genetically viable. This means they will be, or already are inbreeding, this will cause anomalies that are irreversible. When this happens our wild horses will end up being extinct due to mismanagement.

Please speak up, call your federal representative and senators. Tell them we will not allow our wild horses and burros to face mass euthanasia in holding pens (the current plan in the 2018 budget proposal) and we will not allow genetic extinction.

It’s time BLM listened to the science, and the will of the American people who treasure these iconic, majestic creatures who are such an important part of our heritage.

It’s time to protect the original intent of the 1971 Wild Free Roaming Horses & Burros Act.

 UPDATE – September 15, 2017 we made a call to the facility and got voicemail, we left a message letting them know we would be updating the post with their account of what is going on there. No return call was received.

Copyright notice ©CAES article and photos, article and photos may be reprinted in its  entirety, not separated.


1. https://www.blm.gov/programs/wild-horse-and-burro/adoptions-and-sales/adoption-centers/elm-creek-wild-horse-and-burro-corrals

2.  http://www.horsenation.com/2015/04/28/wowza-10-colorful-mustangs-in-the-blm-internet-adoption/

3. http://callieberman.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Boomerang-EWB-Article.pdf

11 thoughts on “BREAKING: BLM, ELM CREEK WILD HORSE & BURRO CORRALS EXPOSED

  1. More reason to continue to fight political forces that impeded our efforts to #KeepWildHorsesWild. We can’t even keep up with saving domestic from the slaughter pipeline. We don’t NEED to HAVE to adopt a mustang. I’ve seen many quality mustangs wind up in auctions bought by kill buyers and in kill pens asking $1000 for untrained mustangs… (that are sick with strangles on top of it). Such greedy, stupid, cruel humans, just like the BLM and welfare ranchers, mining, mineral and gas fracking special interest groups…

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  2. they dont want pzp they dont care! blm has admitted cows are causing the range destruction! pzp is making them unviable. it never stopped re roundups at all. they dont want to control populations they want them ALL dead. so they arent going to use that pesticide. It would take 5 yrs to wipe them out that way and like i said Zinke and all want them gone NOW. illegal as hell. zinke is being sued by many groups why not US for horses do we have a lawsuit? they r killing everything and stealing our land wildlife fish and game also on our dime kill wildlife every 5 mins! this has to stop the eco imbalance is making us all at risk

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  3. Please can you post the phone number for this facility so that we can also call them about the terrible conditions and moldy hay? I would like to call the newspaper and see if a Reporter or some kind of “Problem Solver” reporter would go out there and shame them. Also to call a local news station.

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  4. Department of Interior, should be aware of the things they put in office to protect. Thank you for this undeniable report, unhealthy and unnatural ways of keeping our wild mustang and burros.

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