CAES PUBLIC SAFETY ANNOUNCEMENT

Forest Service and Navajo County Sheriff look the other way while environmental terrorists pick-off our federally protected wild horses in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona & endanger the lives of tourists, local residents, and other endangered and native wildlife.

CAES is very sorry to report that another horse from our beloved Heber Wild Horse Herd has been found dead. The mare was seen alive and healthy just two days ago. As we speak our volunteer ground representatives are on the scene and speaking with Forest Service Ranger Lopez and deputies from the Navajo County Sheriff’s Department.

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This situation has been ongoing since October when 2 stallions were killed, and most recently with the deaths of a mare and foal in early January, another mare and stallion (leaving an unprotected filly weanling on her own) on January 21 and now this mare within the past 2 days.

The situation was complicated by the shutdown so we provided a tip line phone number (541.315.6650) for people to call in anonymously with information that would lead to the arrest of those responsible for these killings. That tipline provided more than 2 dozen tips and when we did not receive return calls from Ranger Lopez and the sheriff’s department was told the case was now in federal jurisdiction we turned to Congressman Raul Grijalva for assistance, we have filed a report with his office and as asked also shared the initial report to the Phoenix FBI. Since then we have received more information, threats to our persons and now another death. However, we will continue to work with the FBI and would work with Ranger Lopez should he care to call us to gather the information we have on this case.

We understand other wild horse advocate groups are interested in what is happening and may have photographed the Heber wild horses, however, the best thing they can do at this time to help is to contribute to the reward fund or contact our office to see what more they can do. Providing any other information may not be accurate or up-to-date, or complete and that could inadvertently damage the work we have put into this thus far.

Our volunteer team has been on the ground, in the courts, and in the working groups for more than 20 years documenting the horses and working hard to protect them. Please give them the respect they deserve to continue to do their work and protect this beloved herd.

The Forest Service has thus far been complacent in resolving this issue and we are hoping that the information we were able to collect, perhaps because the community members were able to call a number that was not a local number or a local person who would put them in danger for speaking out, will now prompt Forest Service to bring the person(s) accountable to justice.

When the Forest Service chose people to be on the working group to develop a management plan for this herd they refused an advocate who knew the forest and the herd but accepted a man who is now making threats against our board member Val Cecama-Hogsett. We believe Forest Service needs to realize that supporting terrorists is not an appropriate management tool.

Joslin Screenshot 2

When people are speaking this way we do not know what they are capable of. We are not saying Mr. Joslin shot these horses or was involved, he was on the working group. However when we have threats like this because we are trying to obtain information about the shootings of our wild horses…we have to worry how safe the public is out there. The recent shootings have happened near roads and near buildings. At this time, unless you have to be in the area, we recommend that you stay out of the forest until the shooter(s) are arrested.

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If you have information or would like to offer assistance please call our national office at 541.315.6650.

We do, and will, work with anyone. However, we do not work with or support those groups who support mass slaughter or euthanasia as population tools. We also believe the horses need to remain wild in the forest and not removed or culled for any reason. We support proactive management with the least human interference possible. Those tools include predators, which have been a large part of the population control of this herd and the use of PZP birth control vaccines.

HAVE YOU SEEN THESE MEN?

IF YOU RECOGNIZE OR HAVE SEEN ANY OF THESE MEN PLEASE CONTACT US.

They may have information about the brutal killings of 2 Heber Wild Horses.

KODAK Digital Still Camera

These three men were seen in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest, Arizona on January 21st, 2019 just hours before the horses were shot. We think they may have information that could lead to an arrest. The following pictures were taken of the vehicle and wild horses they were with at that time. They told our ground crew they had stopped to remove a halter from one of the wild horses. This was not the band that was shot but was still in the same territory.

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We believe at least one of the men is from Young, Arizona. He frequents the forest and often is towing this empty horse trailer.

If you have any information on who these gentlemen are please contact our office at 541.315.6650. We can keep your name confidential.

We just want to locate these men to see if they have information on the shootings. Someone has to have information and there is a reward being offered for information that leads to the arrest and prosecution of the person(s) that have killed 6 horses since December in this wild herd.

UPDATE~~Yesterday we reported that an entire family band was massacred however since then we have found one orphaned weanling filly. She is spooked but otherwise doing fine. Our volunteers are checking on her, we have placed cameras in various places throughout the area and we will keep you updated.

If you would like to contribute to the reward fund or our costs as we continue to fight for this herd and others throughout the west please use the button below to do so.

Again…any information on these men, or if you recognize the truck and trailer please contact us.





R.I.P.

These photos are some of the last taken (Jan.21, 2019) of the stallion and mare killed this week. They were taken the day they were shot, just hours before. We are heartbroken.

KODAK Digital Still Camera

KODAK Digital Still Camera

These are the awful photos taken on the following day (Jan 22, 2019)

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Entire Heber Wild Horse Band Killed

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WHILE TYPING THIS STORY WE FOUND OUT THAT THE LAST MARE AND FOAL IN THIS STALLION’S HERD WERE KILLED TOO…

CAES has been working for 2 days on a story of a mare and foal that were found deceased. While we were working on that story the news that this stallion pictured above was shot last night.

The Navajo County Sheriff and Forest Service (FS) Law Enforcement were out there to investigate this stallions death today. They told our team on the ground that they are sending their veterinarian to retrieve the bullets from the deceased animal which was shot twice.

These incidents are similar to the horses shot in October, and the killers were not found nor were the bullets retrieved from those 2 stallions. We know that the body of this stallion is not being left unwatched while awaiting the arrival of the veterinarian. Last time the horses were buried before the FS retrieved any evidence.

The mare and foal found a few weeks ago were not found in time to determine the cause of death, but were found in the same location as this stallion and 4 young coyotes that were shot.

These incidents have occurred right off State Route 260 in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. It is unclear at this time if we have someone shooting from or toward the highway but we caution anyone who is going to be in the area to be very aware of their surroundings. People who have the ability to kill just for the thrill are known to cross over to killing humans as well.

There is a reward offered for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of the person(s) responsible. And we would like to remind people that killing a wild horse is a federal crime that carries a penalty of $100,000 per horse and/or one year in jail.

Someone has to know something that will help find these perpetrators. If you have any information please call our tip line at 541.315.6650. Your name can be kept anonymous.

Our deepest thanks to Stacey Sanchez for photo evidence and for staying with the newly deceased stallion while we make sure the bullets are retrieved this time. Photos of the earlier incident or mare, foal and coyote are below.

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Public Comment Period on Scoping Process to Use Helicopters in AZ Forests and Wilderness Areas

This time the Forest Service wants to implement the use of helicopters to terrorize bighorn sheep. Another native species under attack because of the livestock industry’s greed and need to control our public lands!

2019-01-11

Read the plan here:
Preliminary Environmental Assessment for Authorization of Helicopter Landings in Wilderness – Tonto National Forest, Gila, Maricopa, Pinal, and Yavapai Counties, Arizona
https://www.fs.usda.gov/nfs/11558/www/nepa/98402_FSPLT3_2068197.pdf

Scoping Letter sent to CAES:

“Dear Interested Party:

The Tonto National Forest proposes to authorize the use of helicopters by the Arizona Game and Fish Department within the Tonto National Forest, including designated wilderness areas, for the purposes of bighorn sheep management. Helicopters would be used to: capture, release, translocate, monitor populations, and conduct research of bighorn sheep within portions of the Tonto National Forest including the Mazatzal, Hells Gate, Four Peaks, Salt River Canyon, and Superstition Wilderness Areas (Figure 1 ). These wilderness areas occur on some portion of all six of the ranger districts within Maricopa, Gila, Yavapai, and Pinal Counties, Arizona. Helicopter operations would be limited to specific days in the month of November beginning November 2014 through potently November 2024. This action is necessary for the Arizona Game and Fish Department to meet bighorn sheep management objectives.

Background

The Arizona Game and Fish Department’s Statewide Action Plan outlines strategies and
conservation actions aimed at promoting partnerships and coordinating efforts among all who hold a stake in conserving Arizona’s wildlife. While the plan addresses the full array of wildlife and habitats, it focuses on identifying and managing the wildlife and habitats that are in the greatest need of conservation. The Statewide Action Plan lists the desert bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis Mexicana) as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need. The Forest Service utilizes a list of management indicator species that serves as a barometer for species viability at the forest level. The Tonto National Forest management indicator species list includes desert bighorn sheep.

Bighorn sheep are recognized as an important wildlife resource in Arizona and throughout the rest of their natural range. Establishing and maintaining healthy populations of all subspecies of bighorn sheep is one of the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s statewide bighorn sheep management objectives. To meet those objectives, the Arizona Game and Fish Department depends on gathering information on habitat use and vital rates that determine population dynamics through the placement of very high frequency and global positioning system (GPS) collars on individual sheep, as well as augmenting populations of bighorn sheep and introducing animals into currently unoccupied po1iions of their historic range. These actions may require the use of helicopters in capturing and transport efforts because of steep terrain, extreme seasonal temperatures, and remote locations. On the Tonto National Forest, a substantial po1iion of the bighorn sheep populations occur within designated wilderness areas not accessible by road.

Purpose and Need

The purpose of this project is for the Forest Service to work with the Arizona Game and Fish Department to meet the management objectives for bighorn sheep within the Tonto National Forest. There is a need for the Forest Service to work with the Arizona Game and Fish Department to assist with research and monitoring needs for a Forest level management indicator species as stipulated in the 1985 Tonto National Forest Plan.

Proposed Action

The proposed action for this project only relates to activities occurring within the Tonto National Forest, specifically the Mazatzal, Hells Gate, Four Peaks, Salt River Canyon, and Superstition Wilderness Areas. The Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits the use of motorized vehicles, motorized equipment, and mechanical transport. Congress acknowledged that there are times when exceptions are allowed to meet the minimum required administration of wilderness areas.

The Tonto National Forest proposes to permit the use of helicopters in designated wilderness areas as identified to further the efforts of bighorn sheep management and research by the Arizona Game and Fish Department. The Arizona Game and Fish Department personnel and authorized contract helicopter personnel would operate and manage all helicopter use for this project. Beginning in November 2014, 20 to 40 bighorn sheep would be captured within the project area; some of which would be fitted with
radio collars and released on site while others would be translocated to the appropriate sites, potentially within state or federal lands. Each November thereafter for up to ten years, capture operations and translocations may occur depending on management needs and population status. Helicopters would be used to safely and quickly access bighorn sheep mortalities and determine locations for capture and subsequent translocation.

The proposed action, more specifically, would involve:

• The use of helicopters in the four wilderness areas to capture bighorn sheep using hand-held net guns. Radio collars would be placed on the sheep or replaced if the collars were non-operational, and the sheep would be released on site. Specifically, these activities would be:

  • Proposed to occur over a 1-3 day period with multiple flights and use of two
    helicopters.
  • Proposed for the month of November during weekdays when public recreation
    use is anticipated to be minimal.
  • Based on expected need of7-1 0 sheep captures, there may be 10-20 landings
    during the 1-3 day period. This may occur annually over the next four years.
  • During landings, the minimal ground disturbance would occur; no or minimal
    disturbance to vegetation, including trees and cactus would occur, as these are
    hazards for safe helicopter operations.

• The use of helicopters in wilderness areas to capture bighorn sheep using hand-held net guns. These sheep will be trans-located to approved areas. Specifically, these activities
would be:

  • Proposed to occur over 1-3 day period with multiple flights and up to two
    helicopters
  • Proposed for the month of November during weekdays when public recreation
    use is anticipated to be minimal.
  • Based on the expected need of 30 sheep captured during the first year, there may be 20-
    30 landings (including long-line operations for extraction) during the 1-3 day
    capture period. This may occur annually over the next four years.
  • During landings, the minimal ground disturbance would occur; no or minimal
    disturbance to vegetation, including trees and cactus would occur, as these are
    hazards for safe helicopter operations

Nature of Decision to Be Made

The Tonto National Forest Supervisor is the responsible official and would decide whether to authorize the use of helicopters by the Arizona Game and Fish Department within the Tonto National Forest, including within designated wilderness areas, for the purposes of bighorn sheep management objectives.

The decision would be based on a consideration of the environmental effects of implementing the proposed action or alternatives developed in response to significant issues. The Forest Supervisor may select the proposed action, an alternative analyzed in detail, or a modified proposed action or alternative within the project’s range of alternatives.

Scoping Process

It is important for reviewers to provide their comments at such times and in such manner that they are useful to the agency’s preparation of the environmental assessment. Therefore, comments should be provided prior to the close of the comment period and should clearly articulate the reviewer’s concerns and contentions.

Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will become part of the public record for this proposed action. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, anonymous comments will not provide the Agency with the ability to provide the respondent with subsequent environmental documents.

Scoping Input Needed

To aid in the identification of issues and the development of alternatives, comments need to be received 30 days after the notice in the paper of record, Arizona Capitol Times. When a party submits comments, please keep them specific to this proposal only. Comments which are not specific to the project and project area would be deemed outside the scope of the analysis and would not be considered. If you are including references, citations, or additional information to be considered for this project, please specify exactly how the material relates to the project. Also, indicate exactly what part of the material you would like us to consider (such as the page or figure number).

Send written comments to:
Neil Bosworth, Forest Supervisor
Attn: Bighorn Sheep Population Management Project
23 24 E. McDowell Road
Phoenix, AZ, 85006.

Comments may also be sent via e-mail to comments-southwestern-tonto(@[s.fed.us or via facsimile to 602-225-5302.

For further information, contact Nate Yorgason, Acting Tonto National Forest Wildlife
Biologist, at 602-225-5213.

Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal
Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800- 877- 8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday”

READ MORE BELOW:
Preliminary Environmental Assessment for Authorization of Helicopter Landings in Wilderness – Tonto National Forest, Gila, Maricopa, Pinal, and Yavapai Counties, Arizona

https://www.fs.usda.gov/nfs/11558/www/nepa/98402_FSPLT3_2068197.pdf

A virtual webinar hosted by Arizona Game and Fish Department will take place in January or February 2019 to address questions about this project.  If you would like to be added to the mailing list for this event, please submit an email to comments-southwestern-tonto@fs.fed.us, Subject: Bighorn Sheep Webinar.

January Quilt Raffle – CLOSED NOW

Congratulations to Nicole Ziegler on winning this awesome quilt! See you for our next quilt raffle soon!

DRAWING TO BE HELD JANUARY 31 SO GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

We are offing the first of 3 quilts to be raffled off for our horses this year. These are gorgeous, soft queen size quilts! Don’t miss your chance at winning one of them.

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Tickets are $20 each or 3 for $50. Fill out the form below and make your purchase and we will email you your ticket numbers!!